Category Archives: Supply Chain

22Feb/21

SAP Re-Imagines Supply Chain Collaboration

SAP Briefing Note

By Daniel R. Matlis

SAP’s Life Sciences leadership team recently briefed Axendia on its re-imagined Supply Chain Collaboration strategy.

Globalization and outsourcing have increased the volume of geographically dispersed partners, facilities, and suppliers in the Life-Science global supply chain. This has resulted in increased supply chain risk and decreased predictability due to variability and complexity and increasing the impact of ‘Black Swan’ events on the healthcare ecosystem. 

Axendia’s research shows that Life-Sciences companies are making the transition to ‘Smart Sourcing’ to achieve visibility control and collaboration beyond the corporate four  walls across into their Value Network.  

Re-imagining Supply Chain Collaboration

To support re-imagined supply chain collaboration, SAP is expanding its offerings to the Life Science industry building on the strength of its Ariba supplier network to support multiple sourcing strategies, as well as the underlying procurement business processes.  

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05Feb/21

2021 Forecast for the Life-Sciences Industry

Industry must adapt and overcome current and future disruptive trends on the horizon. To assist in this effort, Axendia revealed the 2021 Life-Sciences Radar.

In this episode of Straight from the Source, Axendia’s President and Founder, Daniel R. Matlis and Sandra K. Rodriguez, Market Analyst discuss how major disruptions in 2020 have accelerated key modernization initiatives to support resilience through the Life-Science value network.  They also address the need for interdependence across these transformational initiatives to overcome business, regulatory, technology and cultural inertia and plot a course to success.

31Jul/20

Closing the Loop to Overcome a Disrupted Life-Sciences Reality

Introduction

The demand for organizational visibility, control, and collaboration to achieve resilience is a catalyst to modernization and digital transformation in the Life-Science industry.

Successful medical device manufacturers are increasingly using a closed loop cloud- native platforms to quickly respond to unforeseen events. This approach allows manufacturers to accelerate new product introduction, improve customer satisfaction, and lower costs while remaining compliant.

Integrating QMS, PLM, CRM and Field Service management on a single platform creates a closed loop platform that improves product design for quality while managing worldwide compliance and providing a competitive advantage.

To explore technology’s role in overcoming a disrupted Life Sciences reality, I was joined in a “Straight from the Source” webinar by:

  • Chuck Serrin, Vice President Industry Marketing for Med Tech and Life Sciences at Propel
  • Kevin Chien, Vice President, Medtech Strategy at Salesforce

During this webinar, we discussed opportunities to leverage technology to:

  • Using Cloud solutions to enable Positive Disruption
  • Driving Collaboration and Visibility Across the Product Lifecycle
  • Closing the Loop to Improve Visibility Across the Value Chain
  • Deploying a Digital Strategy to Provide Resilience
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18Mar/20

COVID-19 Black Swan Colliding with Your Supply Chain?

By: Daniel R. Matlis, President, Axendia, Inc.

Globalization and outsourcing have increased the volume of geographically dispersed partners, facilities, and suppliers in the Life-Science global supply chain. This has resulted in increased supply chain risk and decreased predictability due to variability and complexity and increasing the impact of ‘Black Swan’ events on the healthcare ecosystem.

In 2010 we started preaching about some of the risks associated with globalization, outsourcing and single sourcing in Life-Sciences (See Research Report Achieving Global Supply Chain Visibility, Control & Collaboration in Life‐Sciences: “Regulatory Necessity, Business Imperative”).

While many analysts focused on the rewards of these practices, Axendia took a holistic risk-based approach.

Globalization and Outsourcing allowed the COVID-19 Back Swan to Take the Crown:

In his book “The Black Swan: The impact of the highly improbable,” Nassim Taleb defines a ‘Black Swan’ as an event characterized by rarity, extreme impact, and retrospective (though not prospective) predictability.

Corona (Latin for Crown) is likely the largest Black Swan event to affect the Life-Science supply chain in a generation.

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15May/19

Supply Chain Visibility: A Regulatory Necessity and Business Imperative

Brand owners are legally responsible for the safety, efficacy and quality of their products

By: Daniel R. Matlis, President

The globalization of life science products has created unique opportunities and demanding challenges for both industry and regulators.

The globalization and outsourcing of life science products began in the late 1990s. At the time, life science companies began to evaluate their core competencies and decided to outsource non-core competency functions. The primary reason for this trend was to lower costs.

Globalization has also opened new markets for life science products worldwide, with emerging economies representing fresh markets. Concurrently, issues with supply chain security became the responsibility of all parties involved in the procurement/sourcing, manufacturing, packaging and distribution of raw materials, intermediates, and final product to deliver safe and effective medicines to customers.

Recommendations for a New Supply Network Paradigm
Supply chain dynamics are prompting life science companies to seek innovative approaches that improve product safety while simultaneously enhancing clinical outcomes, reducing costs and risks, and ensuring regulatory compliance. To attain the sustained benefits of globalization, the life science products ecosystem must implement a new paradigm to manage global supply chains.

770_mainCompanies must implement new strategies while proactively reducing and controlling risks. This calls for changing the business, technology, and regulatory models traditionally used in the industry. The three key components to managing this shift are on-demand visibility, supply network control, and collaboration.

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