Category Archives: People

29Jun/06

I Lost the Cure for the Common Cold!

By Daniel R. Matlis 

It’s 3:00 AM and your newborn baby wakes up crying. You want to go back to sleep, but his circadian rhythm is set for Beijing, not Philadelphia, and he is wide awake.So you get a cup of coffee, turn on your laptop and start to do some work. In a moment of inspiration, you discover the cure for the common cold. It’s all there on the screen right in front of your eyes and then your baby kicks, the coffee spills on your laptop and, just like that, the cure is gone. Who do you call?

Monday, at the Corporate Computing Show in NY, I met the people for the job. DriveSavers Data Recovery is a company that recovers data from crashed and damaged media. They have been doing this for over 20 years and when James Bond looses the data in his laptop he doesn’t call Q. Instead he deals with Kelly Chessen, Data Crisis Counselor DriveSavers (Yes, Sean Connery is a client).

With the prospect of irretrievable information loss, many of the callers with whom Chessen deals are as distraught. The emotional trauma associated with the loss of critical data can be disruptive both at work and at home.

Chessen came to DriveSavers with a background in psychology that serves her well in her dealings with often-frantic customers. She worked with a suicide prevention hotline for more than five years, including one year as the manager and trainer. This is exactly the kind of training I want the person on the other end of the line to have under these circumstances.

In addition to the soft skills, DriveSavers has technical skills and facilities to back them up. They have recovered data from drives that have been damaged, dropped, deleted, burnt, crushed and drowned in the Amazon River. The company has a success rate of over 90%, and recovers data in as little as 24 hours from all operating systems and storage media including hard drives, disk arrays, floppies, CD-ROM, DVD, removable cartridges and digital camera media. They have they own calls 100 clean room, and if they work on your drive, the manufacturer’s warranty is still good, although I’m not sure that a drive full of Amazon River water is covered.

So the next time your husband, wife, son, daughter, dog, cat or self spill a cup of coffee on your laptop containing the cure for the common cold, or the therapeutic area you are working on, don’t sweat it, lay on the couch and call the Data Shrink.

14Jun/06

Are Post-it Notes Security's Worst Enemy?

By Daniel R. Matlis

In his recent InformationWeek article entitled “Let The UBS Trial Be A Warning To You” Mitch Wagner covers the trial against a former UBS employee charged with hacking the company’s networks. The article also addresses some of the embarrassing failures in UBS’s security and disaster preparedness.

According to testimony from a UBS IT manager, some 40 systems administrators at the company shared the same ‘root’ password to login. There they had free rein to install software or make any changes they wished. It was not unusual for systems administrators to get up from their desks and wander off while still logged in as ‘root’.

It is a fact that companies often spend millions implementing the latest and greatest security technology. The rationale is that technology will keep us secure.

The reality is that the best security technology is not worth a dime if people find a way around it. People must me trained and reminded of proper security procedure. For example don’t share passwords, it’s like giving your ATM card and PIN to anyone who asks, delete default passwords, remember Oracle’s Scott/Tiger and most everyone else’s Admin/Admin.

But in my experience, Post-it® notes are security’s worst enemy.  I cannot tell you how many times I walk up to someone’s desk and stuck to the monitor is a Post-it® notes with a list of system names and their respective passwords.

The path to security begins with people. Let’s not confiscate all Post-it® notes in the company. Instead, let’s train our people on proper security procedures.

Post-it® is a trademark of 3M