Tag Archives: Healthcare

06Sep/18
68530 Connected Doctor

The Value of Analytics in Value-Based Healthcare

Perspectives from Key Stakeholders in the Healthcare Ecosystem

By: Daniel R. Matlis, President

The primary drivers for Healthcare today are improving the quality of patient outcomes, enhancing patient-centered care and adopting initiatives that control costs while maximizing patient benefit.

Healthcare ecosystem stakeholders, including physicians, clinicians and supply chain professionals utilize data to make value-based procurement decisions for medical devices to ensure and improve patient access to high quality devices.  The integrity of these decisions depends upon the accuracy and completeness of unbiased analysis of underlying data to support patient care decisions.

To gain insights from key stakeholders on the use of analytics to support the transition to value based healthcare, Axendia interviewed a group of thought-leaders representing the Medical Device Innovation Consortium (MDIC) Case for Quality Product Quality Outcomes Analytics (PQOA) working group.

Each stakeholder offered their unique perspective on the value proposition for the PQOA Dashboard.

These thought-leaders are (in alphabetical order):

Stephanie Christopher – Program Director at Medical Device Innovation Consortium (MDIC).

Garth Conrad VP Quality at BD Peripheral Intervention.

Michael Ruhlen – MD, MHCM, FAAP, VP Division of Medical Education, Atrium Health

Michael Schiller – CMRP, Senior Director at the Association for Healthcare Resource & Materials Management (AHRMM)

Nathan Soderborg PhD, Principal Scientist, Statistical and Data Sciences, Exponent.

Francisco (Cisco) Vicenty Program Manager for Case for Quality, Office of Compliance, CDRH, FDA (OPEQ Pilot: Immediate Office, Strategic Initiatives Staff)

Register to Receive this Report.

05Jun/18
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New Research: The Impact of the Internet of Medical Things (IoMT) on Patient Outcomes

Axendia conducted a research study focusing on the medical device industry’s ability to build a Culture of Innovation and Quality and we sought to understand the Impact of the Internet of Medical Things (IoMT) on Patient Outcomes and how IoMT is changing the business of healthcare.

We successfully identified and analyzed trends, requirements and initiatives organizations are undertaking to proactively manage products and platforms across the product lifecycle.
In addition to our latest e-Book, we also developed an Infographic.

 

Request your copy now and learn:

  • How the medical device business will change over the next five years as a result of IoT initiatives
  • The biggest challenges companies face when bringing smart, connected devices to market
  • The biggest patient benefits of smart, connected devices
  • What type of medical device companies see IoMT as the biggest business disruptor

In support of the research, we surveyed 110 medical device professionals representing 59 medical device manufacturers from 12 countries, and engaged in one-on-one interviews and group discussions with industry thought leaders.

05Mar/18
cyber security

The Need for Cyber Security in the Healthcare System

Cyber security may be expensive, but the cost of a life is more

By: Giselle C. Matlis, Research Assistant

Imagine someone hacks your Facebook account.  You freak out, then figure a way to get the hackers out of your account, notify Facebook, change your password and move on.  Problem solved.

But what if the hacked system isn’t your Facebook?  Instead it’s a pacemaker in someone’s heart, or an entire hospital’s records and devices.  What would you do then?

In recent years, there have been many life-changing medical devices innovations that have helped thousands of people.  Connecting devices to the internet and hospital networks has contributed to this influx.  Medical device connectivity enables doctors to monitor and administer drugs to their patients from a far, allowing patients to live more normal lives.  Connecting them to the internet also helps to electronically update patient charts, minimizing the risk of transcription errors and drives improved patient outcomes.The goal of connected medical devices and aggregated data is to assist physicians in making informed decisions for treatment. Continue reading

19Jun/17
Web

Focusing on Post-Discharge Communication and Connected Care to Reduce Readmission Rates

By: Chuck Hayes, Vice President of Product Management for TeleVox Solutions at West Corporation

Driving Better Patient Outcomes

High readmission rates have resulted in steep financial penalties for hospitals and intensified the need for health system providers to become more actively involved in post-discharge care. As the healthcare industry continues to embrace value-based payment models, hospitals are being held accountable for the long-term health of their patients, and they are facing pressure to keep patients engaged, in compliance with care plans, and out of the hospital. With Medicare penalties for hospitals surpassing $520 million this year alone, hospitals are looking to implement strategies that put a greater emphasis on two critical areas: follow-up communication and patient engagement.

Results from a recent West survey revealed that half of acute care professionals feel insufficient follow-up by hospital teams is a leading factor that contributes to readmissions. Another 32 percent of those surveyed suggested that a lack of communication on the part of providers also leads to readmissions. In order to reduce readmissions, hospital and health system providers need to work to keep communication lines open, while also providing meaningful interactions and intra-visit support to those patients that have left the hospital. And all of this must be done in a cost-effective manner.

The idea that providers need to offer more post-discharge support is a sentiment echoed by patients who want to see hospital teams expand long-term support efforts. Medicare’s HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) surveys show that patients often feel disconnected from their medical team after discharge. In fact, recent HCAHPS data reveals that half of surveyed patients reported feeling confused or uncertain about how to comply with care instructions after being discharged from the hospital.

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