Tag Archives: Dassault Systemes

13Nov/19
SIAE cover image

Inventing New Horizons with Science as a Catalyst

Event Brief: Science in the Age of Experience 

By: Sandra K. Rodriguez, Market Analyst

I had the opportunity to cover “Science in the Age of Experience” in Boston in October.  The annual Dassault Systèmes conference brought together 500 attendees, representing 250 companies.  This year customer presentations focused on new ways of experiencing and shaping science in Life (better living), in Engineering (product innovation) and in Nature (sustainable planet).

Bernard Charlès, Vice Chairman and CEO of Dassault Systèmes opened the event by stating, You can’t have knowledge if you don’t have knowhow.” Charlès continued with, “The biggest challenge in innovation is over-communicating and under-understanding.”  The agenda was filled with presentations by members of MIT and Harvard, plus Dassault Systèmes’ clients who are seeking to not just understand the correlations between product, nature and life… but are inventing new horizons with science as the catalyst.

Standing on Solid Ground with SOLIDWORKS

Hugh HerrHugh Herr, Professor of MIT Media Lab and co-director of the MIT Center for Extreme Bionics; Founder of BionX, Inc., had both legs amputated from just under the knee after suffering from frostbite during a mountain climbing accident in the early 1980s. He pointed out the surgical procedure that doctors performed following his accident had not changed since the late 1800s.  As a result, although he could walk again with the help of his first set of prosthetics, he was unable to associate the feeling of pressure or movement in his ankles or feet.  With both pant legs rolled up to expose his bionic limbs he stated, “From the knee down, my legs are a bunch of nuts and bolts.”   He then informed us that in addition to the nuts and bolts are sensors, and an entire bionic ecosystem that gives him the ability to move, walk, jump and pivot naturally.  Continue reading

25Jul/19
Dassault France

Medidata: The Missing Link in Dassault Systèmes Powerful Portfolio to Support the Life-Science Industry

Dassault Systèmes Analyst Conference Brief 2019

By: Sandra K. Rodriguez, Market Analyst

The news out of this years’ Dassault Systèmes Analyst Conference was huge: a $5.8 Billion merger offer with clinical data giant, Medidata.  We received the news while traveling from our hotel to the Dassault Systèmes headquarters, nestled in Vélizy-Villacoublay, France.  Aside from the size of the deal – the largest in the history of Dassault Systèmes – Medidata was the missing link in its powerful portfolio to support the Life-Science industry.

Bernard Charlès, CEO and vice-chairman of the board of directors at Dassault Systèmes, opened the two-day meeting with, “To do ‘smart’ anything, you need to know the environment.  The platform phenomenon is not an IT topic… it’s a new way for companies to work.”  Dassault Systèmes now has 250,000 customers, with 25 million users in 140 countries.  The 3DEXPERIENCE platform currently consists of 11 brands/applications that support the ability for people and businesses to develop, collaborate and build products and services in both the virtual and real worlds.

Dassault Systèmes considers itself a Scientific company, first and foremost.   The Industry Renaissance theme of this years’ conference was explained in simple terms by Morgan Zimmermann, CEO for NETVIBES-EXALEAD (the Dassault Systèmes solution for turning large amounts of information into intelligence).  “Think of Renaissance as the new book. The book changed how we distributed knowledge; Industry Renaissance for Dassault Systèmes is the usage of experience as a new way to distribute knowledge and know-how” explained Zimmermann.

The 3DEXPERIENCE Platform offers both people and businesses, virtual universes to imagine, develop and collaborate using innovative solutions.

Life is the New Work Bench

Mentioned earlier in this brief, Medidata was the missing link in the Dassault Systèmes solution platform to support end-to-end product development in the Life-Sciences.  “Pharmaceutical and Biotech companies require roughly ten to twelve years in the R&D phase to bring a drug or therapy to market” explained Claire Biot, Ph.D., VP of Life Sciences Industry at Dassault Systèmes.  Therefore, shifting that timeline left early on in the clinical trial phase of a product adds significant value to Life-Sciences companies.

Image Courtesy of Dassault Systèmes

Image Courtesy of Dassault Systèmes – Claire Bisot.

Clinical trials are necessary to prove the safety and efficacy of a drug on not only a patient population, but the medical condition itself.

Download and read the entire Briefing Note.

24Jul/18
Dassault LS Image

Dassault Targets Life-Sciences with Mind, Body and Soul

2018 Analyst Brief

By: Daniel R. Matlis, President 

At this year’s conference, Dassault Systèmes demonstrated that they are going after Life-Sciences with Mind, Body, and Soul. Under the leadership of Bernard Charlès, Vice Chairman, Chief Executive Officer, the company displays a rare culture focused on long term audacious goals, driven by unbridled passion yet measured by meticulous execution. Charlès has helped instill a culture of ongoing innovation to further consolidate Dassault Systèmes’ scientific capabilities and make science part of the company’s DNA.

According to Charlès, “Dassault is a company with a long term mentality focused on the success of its customers. Dassault is about creating differentiating software that meets the needs of its clients.

Jean Colombel, Vice-President, Life-Sciences at Dassault Systèmes, commented that the company is working to enable innovative patient experiences through an Holistic Patient-Centric strategy.

Daniel R. Matlis, President at Axendia

Daniel R. Matlis, President at Axendia

In this brief, we reveal how Dassault Systèmes is effectively:

  • Going After the Mind: Building on the success of the Living Heart project, Dassault decided to model another “simple” organ, the human brain, the home of the mind.
  • Improving the Body: The 3D Experience platform allows the design and testing of in-silico 3D experiments based on virtual models, informed by real world evidence.
  • Putting its Soul into Health: Digital environments are pushing the bounds of possibility to transform research, science, the pharmaceutical industry, and medicine in general.

Register to read the full event brief.

09Apr/18
Living-heart-project

Simulation for Product, Nature and Life

With 3D Printing and Virtual Human Modeling and Simulation, Life Science companies have the opportunity to innovate faster and with more confidence than ever before

By: Sandra K. Rodriguez, Market Analyst

SIMULIA is one of eleven brands at Dassault Systèmes.  During their Analyst Day, company executives provided an overview of the brand’s simulation offerings under a common theme: Enabling end-to-end digital design to production processes by deploying all multiphysics simulation technologies to enable clients to start making parts and systems that work, faster.

Print to Perform

3D Printing, also referred to as Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a complex process. However, on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, users can digitally accelerate AM while creating lightweight, yet functional generative designs.  When moving from powder to working parts, there are significant challenges in the real-world process phase of AM. Using simulation for build planning, virtual printing, post-processing and heat treatment effects can optimize the build and ultimately save time by reducing errors and rework. With virtual printing, users can simulate not just a printing process but post-processing procedures and conduct in-service validation. Rather than relying on static documents and experience from expensive physical builds, establishing a digital thread from design to field performance unites all functionality and eliminates silos via a digital platform.  SIMULIA’s Additive Manufacturing message is clear: Print to Perform.

Virtual Human Modeling

Karl D’Souza, Sr. Solution Consultant, SIMULIA Virtual Human Modeling at Dassault Systèmes, pointed out that simulation is widespread in the development of medical devices but that a lot more is possible. In particular, medical device companies are now creating more realistic models of the human body to understand how a product will perform in its intended environment.  Continue reading